Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    JMS is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA.
    Posts
    2,201

    Default Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    DS (5+ months old) has a little boo boo on his finger (I think his nail was a bit ingrown) that is having a hard time healing. He is at the age where his hands are in his mouth all day. If it were my own hand, I know using Neosporin would help it heal quickly, but after reading the warning statements, I'm not comfortable using it on DS.

    TIA!
    JMS
    Mommy to DD "HH" 2004
    and DS1 "MH" 2005
    & DS2 "JJH" - My very Irish baby!

  2. #2
    dr mom is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,569

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    I put Lansinoh (lanolin) on all DS's little scrapes - it keeps them clean and creates a little bit of a moisure barrier. Plus we had a ton of it leftover from our early days of nursing, so I was looking for a way to use it up. Good for dry skin on your elbows, knees and feet, too. ;)
    Cindy, Mommy to DS 2/04 and DS 2/08

  3. #3
    dhano923 is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    So. CA.
    Posts
    1,519

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    I do Aquaphor to keep her saliva off the cut (she has broken the skin on her finger twice because her newly erupted teeth!).
    Danni
    DS 10/03
    DD 11/05

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    9,114

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    If you're nursing, put some breastmilk on his owie. Seriously. It's a great antibacterial agent.

    I also second the Lanisoh recommendation. If possible, try and put some on after he's gone to sleep (warm it in your hands first so it is easier to apply). That way it will have a chance to create a bit of a barrier.

    Hope he's better soon.


    -m
    Wife to Jonathan
    Mom to Sophia 12/02 and Amelia 12/04

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    AZ.
    Posts
    904

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    Breastmilk was going to be my 1st answer, too. It's the best! Always helped to heal DD's little scrapes. :)

    My LC's husband is a pharmacist & she told us that he chose his daughter's EBM as his "drug of choice" to heal his pinkeye once when they were on vacation. ;)
    Abby 2004
    Ryan 2006
    and baby brother EDD July 2014!

  6. #6
    cara1 Guest

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    Bacitracin

  7. #7
    JElaineB is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    .
    Posts
    3,941

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    Since the OP is worried about her baby ingesting it, I wouldn't recommend bacitracin:

    "bacitracin (băs'*tr?'s*n) , antibiotic produced by a strain of the bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. It is widely used for topical therapy such as for skin and eye infections; it is effective against gram-positive bacteria, including strains of staphylococcus that are resistant to penicillin (see Gram's stain). Bacitracin is toxic to humans and is no longer used internally." from Answers.com

    Jennifer
    mom to Jacob 9/27/02

  8. #8
    Judegirl Guest

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    Calendula ointment - both Hylands and Boiron make one, and it's homeopathic and antibacterial, and soothing as well.

  9. #9
    cara1 Guest

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    I'm not sure that Answers.com is a reputable medical site with medical information.

    Bacitracin is a standard medication given to adults and children. It even remains available in injectable forms (intramuscular). I don't think you'll find any information available on toxicity of oral ingestion of topical ointment. It should be fine.

    If the OP is concerned, why not ask your pediatrician?

  10. #10
    JElaineB is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    .
    Posts
    3,941

    Default RE: Is there a baby-friendly, non-toxic version of Neosporin?

    1) It is not FDA approved in children
    2) It is a component of Neosporin which the OP was trying to avoid
    3) There are several black box warnings concerning use of IM bacitracin, and the OP is asking about topical not IM injection.

    This is from the drug formulary at the pharmacy college where I work. I can look it up in a few other drug information databases if you like.

    BACITRACIN
    Common Tradenames (See Complete Tradename Listing)
    AK-Tracin
    Baciguent
    Baciim
    Ocu-Tracin
    Class
    Antibacterial
    Antibiotic
    Dosage, Adult (usual)
    Bacterial infection of eye: apply thin ribbon of opthalmic ointment every 3-4 hr for 7-10 days
    Superficial bacterial infection of skin: apply TOPICALLY 2-5 times/day
    Dosage, Pediatric, (usual)
    Not FDA approved in children
    Bacterial infection of eye: apply thin ribbon of ophthalmic ointment every 3-4 hr for 7-10 days
    Superficial bacterial infection of skin: apply TOPICALLY 2-5 times/day
    Administration
    skin infections; do not use on deep or puncture wounds, serious burns or raw areas
    skin infections; wash affected area with soap and water and dry prior to application
    How Supplied
    Intramuscular Powder for Solution: 10000 U, 50000 U
    Ophthalmic Ointment: 500 U/GM
    Topical Ointment: 500 U/GM
    Indications
    FDA labeled indications
    Bacterial infection of eye
    Superficial bacterial infection of skin
    Contraindications
    hypersensitivity to bacitracin products
    Precautions
    ophthalmic ointment may retard corneal wound healing
    prolonged use may result in overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms
    bacterial resistance may develop
    sensitivity to aminoglycosides or polymyxins
    Adverse Effects
    COMMON
    Cardiovascular: Swelling
    Dermatologic: Contact dermatitis, Pruritus
    Ophthalmic: Blurred vision, Red eye
    Drug Interactions
    Alcuronium (moderate, probable)
    Atracurium (moderate, probable)
    Cisatracurium (moderate, probable)
    Doxacurium (moderate, probable)
    Fazadinium (moderate, probable)
    Gallamine (moderate, probable)
    Hexafluorenium (moderate, probable)
    Metocurine (moderate, probable)
    Mivacurium (moderate, probable)
    Pancuronium (moderate, probable)
    Pipecuronium (moderate, probable)
    Rapacuronium (moderate, probable)
    Rocuronium (moderate, probable)
    Tubocurarine (moderate, probable)
    Vecuronium (moderate, probable)
    Pregnancy Category
    C
    Breast Feeding
    Infant risk cannot be ruled out.

    Jennifer
    mom to Jacob 9/27/02

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •