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  1. #11
    lorien_ca is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA.
    Posts
    2,075

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    hmm, no science behind it, but i have pretty good luck with our new fridge. i can tell you that our fruit in particular lasts A LOT longer in our new fridge than it did in the old one. we had the original 'builders special' low end GE that was put in when the house was built 15ish years ago up until last year. when we upgraded to a new maytag french door (mid range stand alone type fridge, not a built in) last year, all of the sudden, our produce, milk and other dairy/cheese, etc. started lasting a lot longer. it does have a little humidity slider for each of the two produce drawers for fruit vs.veggies, but i have no idea what the fridge does differently for the two settings. we've found we get the best performance from it when the fridge is set at 37 degrees for this particular model (but it has a separate little vent to chill the milk compartment down lower - prolly 35ish?)

    as far as what goes where, my general rule is to start with whatever the grocery store would do with it. so things like bananas stay out until *just* ripe (little to no green left, but has not darkend to the deeper yellow yet). then i put them in the fridge. they do brown on the peels, but the fruit inside stays firm and fresh for an extra 4 or 5 days. all of my farmers market fruit like plums, peaches, nectarines, mangos, avocados and apricots are the same. i leave them out until when they are *just* ripe (the tiniest bit of softness/give) and then put them in the fridge if we haven't gotten to them yet. grapes, cherries and berries that would be refrigerated at the store go straight into the fridge at home. i tend to wash as i use. i also try to rotate thru the berries/grapes i have on hand so i can cull any trouble makers and use the most ripe first. if i've picked multiple berries for the week, i start with the most mold prone first (generally use raspberries first, blackberries, strawberries, blueberries and then cherries).

    root veggies that aren't peeled stay out. i don't buy in the huge bags tho, so i generally have no problem using before they start to sprout.

    any veggies that would be in the chiller section of the grocery go straight into the veggie drawer, even if they come from the farmer's market, unwashed, unpeeled. but i tend to buy and use within the week, so maybe that's why i'm not having an issue?

    as far as your cuc's go, any chance you're buying them ripe and ready to eat? maybe you can ask your produce guy/gal to help you pick a couple, one that's ready to eat right away, and one that will last you a few more days before it's ready to go? i also found a great little book at williams sonoma that i flip thru whenever i'm in their store about how to pick out each kind of fruit and veggie. i've picked up some good tips from it as well over the years.

    hth, lori
    lori

    sam 5/19/05 and max 10/29/08
    how lucky i am that you chose me.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    4,614

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    I got these EGG things http://www.4theegg.com/ at Whole Foods and they seem to be really helping. I put one in each drawer - one for the fruit and one for the veggies. It works by absorbing the gas that the produce give off which is what makes them ripen faster. My biggest problem was the grapes growing mold after 3-4 days and now they are staying fresh between shopping trips (at least one week).
    Lisa
    Emma 11/02
    Adam 2/07
    Their hands may be small but their feelings are just as big as ours.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    The Triangle
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    4,310

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    I have tupperware fridgesmart containers that have really helped with keeping my veggies and fruit longer. They work great.
    Sonia, who is eagerly awaiting the magic laundry fairy to visit me
    Mommy to M girls

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    2,698

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    Quote Originally Posted by WatchingThemGrow
    That is some amazing hang-around time...

    What kind of containers to do find that work well, or is it the "work" you put into prepping them ahead of time?

    Sad to know Debbie's bags don't work. It was a fleeting thought, but I thought that if they ended up on "that wall" at Bed Bath and Beyond, they must be a gimmick. Now I won't even look.
    Sorry meant to share that too. I got distracted a dozen times earlier (can't imagine why?).....

    The containers I have are from Sharper Image. Supposedly there's silver or something in the plastic that helps keep things fresh. They are definitely the most airtight containers I've had. Of course they are also the first storage containers I've had besides disposable gladware. The set I have was also at Costco earlier this year, but I tried to find them recently and they didn't have any.

  5. #15
    sdjeppa is offline Silver level (200+ posts)
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA.
    Posts
    348

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    Actually, I have found the "debbie's bags" DO work. We are part of a CSA, and we were getting so much, it would go bad before we could eat it. Now I have lettuce and stuff lasting well over a week, when before it was wilty within 3 days or so. They have made it so I wasn't wasting as much as I was before, because some days we weren't home to cook, so it would go to waste.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    941

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    Does anyone else find that their organic produce seems to go bad faster or maybe it is that I get a lot of the organic stuff at TJ's?
    Jen

    Emily 5/19/05
    Katie 8/14/07
    Chase 10/31/12

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