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  1. #1
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    Default spinoff: Montessori

    Ok...i know i'm gonna sound like an idiot, but can someone explain to me what a montessori school is? i know it's a different kind of teaching and learning, but can anyone explain more than that to me?

  2. #2
    maestramommy's Avatar
    maestramommy is offline Pink Diamond level (15,000+ posts)
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    From what I've heard it's more self-directed learning, at least for the very young grades. For example, in preschool, the child decides what she/he wants to play with/work on, and goes and does it. But I think the self-direction is within a structure of some sort. I also remember hearing something about how they have miniatures of things like brooms and dustpans and kids learn how to clean up together. I'm interested in finding a Montessori preschool for Dora when it's time.
    Melinda
    Mommy to
    The Gift 10/01/05
    Elfgirl 5/25/07
    Sparky 6/27/09

    "Sunset to Twilight, Our Family's Journey with Alzheimer's." http://maestramommi.blogspot.com/




  3. #3
    kijip is offline Pink Diamond level (15,000+ posts)
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    http://www.montessori.edu/ look like it covers the bases on the approach.
    Katie, mama to a pair of boys.

  4. #4
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    mothering dot com has a forum on comparing educational approaches, including montessori. I think it is just www.mothering.com and click on discussions or forums or something like that. Then scroll down to the education section. Might find some information there.

  5. #5
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    I went through Montessori training in 1997 when I began working in a school district in Houston that put Montessori in a public school. When people ask I say "It is a multi-age level (2-5)classroom that allows a child to progress at their own level." (I am not certain of the other breakdowns for the older children, I did not do this traing, Houston does have one of the few Montessori High Schools in the Country) For instance when a child is ready to move ahead they are "Given a Lesson" by either a teacher or an older child, depending on the complexity, and then work that lesson until they are profficient. Montessori classes look different also, they are no huge bulletin boards that are bright and colorful, the room is usually very quiet, usually because the children are busy. We had only one table, children worked on small rugs, this is where they put their "work". They are busy because there is very little lag time, a child usually acts out because they are bored, if they are bored they can have a new lesson on something harder or something that challenges them. One of the best things I think is the multi-age classroom. As a teacher you never get 22 green kids. Where I taught we had eight 4yo, seven 3yo. and seven 2yo. this is a perfect mix b/c the 4yo. that have been in the program for 2 years took a 2yo under their wing and helped them. The only thing that I question about Montessori and this may have changed from when I went through the training is the requirements for instructors. Where I did my training (Houston Montessori Center, affiliated with AMS, American Montessori Society) a person can be 18 have a high school diploma or the equivelent, go through 8 weeks of training, 1 year of student teaching in a Montessori school, and they go into the classroom. I do not believe that a college degree means that someone is a better teacher than someone without a college degree, but I do believe age plays a part. At 27 I was a much better teacher than I was at 22 and I can't imagine being a teacher at 18 or 19.
    I live in an area that has no Montessori program so I try and do things with my daughter specifically the phonics portion that I thought were excellent. Most Montessori schools are very open to observation and it really is necessary because it is a different type of classroom. I believe it produces an independant child that can function well in either another Montessori program or a public school classroom. Hope this wasn't to long or wordy...

    Jane
    Madeline and Emily's Mom
    1/20/03 11/29/05

  6. #6
    kelly ann is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    The multi-age classrooms were odd for us in the beginning. Mostly because DS was small for his age and I worried about him getting run over by all of the older kids. And then I realized that the older kids were helping him out - taking them under their wing. I think it is a great concept and allows the child to work ahead in some areas or behind in other areas - without having them go to another classroom. Also, I love that DS will have the same teacher for 3 years. It provides such a great constant in his schooling.

  7. #7
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    Montessori is a great program, but it is not for every child. Keep in mind what your child is like. Your child can play with blocks all day and build bridges, but can't put on a shiny dress and be a "princess".

    Also, just because a school calls itself a Montessori school doesn't mean it actually is. Check the Montessori website to see if the school is accredited by them.

    Karin and Katie 10/24/02

  8. #8
    jennabear Guest

    Default The Goddard School Vs. Montessori

    This sounds pretty much like the program my son is in at Goddard. Self directed but structured. What exactly is the difference? I really am curious.

    TIA

  9. #9
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    It also helps the teacher, if you know 2/3's of the class already that new set of 2yo's aren't that scary in August.

    Jane
    Madeline and Emily's Mom
    1/20/03 11/29/05

  10. #10
    kelly ann is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
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    Default RE: spinoff: Montessori

    So true. Looking back, I always wondered how they gave him the attention he needed being new in the 3-6 yo class and being just potty-trained for 1 week. Now I realize it was because there were not 20 other children like DS. That is a good thing for me to remember next time some of my other friends balk when finding out DS is in a classroom with 6 year olds.

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