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  1. #21
    KpbS's Avatar
    KpbS is offline Red Diamond level (10,000+ posts)
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    No, definitely not more Presbyterian/Methodist/Lutheran etc. But I think for some denominations, Baptist for one and to the Catholic church baptism does have a very different meaning and significance.

    Quote Originally Posted by mamicka View Post
    Yes, I know that. I just mean - so the OP decides to have DC baptized in the Presbyterian church. Does that mean that the DC will somehow be considered more Presbyterian? That baptism will be recognized by the Catholic church as no different than a baptism in a Catholic church. So what's the difference? So I guess what I mean by "just baptized" is - does it have to be qualified by the denomination? For example, does one have to say I was baptized Methodist or can one just say I was baptized?

    Maybe I'm not explaining myself well.

    FTR, I understand that the sacrament of baptism is very important, it certainly is to me. I'm not making light of it by saying "just baptized". I also think that the OP should really think about what baptism means to them as others have advised. I'm just wondering if people think it makes a difference which denomination performs the baptism.
    ITA that the OP should spend some time thinking and talking to her DH about what baptism means to each and their desires concerning religious education and church membership for their family.
    Last edited by KpbS; 08-28-2009 at 09:15 PM. Reason: typo
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  2. #22
    mamicka is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by KpbS View Post
    Catholic church baptism does have a very different meaning and significance.
    But the Catholic church also recognizes that a baptism performed in a Protestant church holds no different significance for someone wanting to join a Catholic parish. In other words, someone wanting to join the Catholic church who has been baptized in a Protestant church would not have to be re-baptized in a Catholic church. No?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamicka View Post
    Yes, I know that. I just mean - so the OP decides to have DC baptized in the Presbyterian church. Does that mean that the DC will somehow be considered more Presbyterian? That baptism will be recognized by the Catholic church as no different than a baptism in a Catholic church. So what's the difference? So I guess what I mean by "just baptized" is - does it have to be qualified by the denomination? For example, does one have to say I was baptized Methodist or can one just say I was baptized?
    The Catholic Church will recognize the Presbyterian (or other Protestant) baptism as licit and valid, but not exactly the same as a Catholic baptism. A child (or adult) baptized in the Catholic Church is a member of the Catholic Church, while the child who is baptized in a Protestant church is not. This is true even if the individual does not practice the Catholic faith as long as he/she does not explicitly and formally convert to another faith.

    For example, my husband was baptized in a Catholic Church, but was not raised Catholic or in any particular faith(due to a situation similar to the OP). His family attended several different types of churches while he was growing up, but he never converted to or sought membership in any of them. Because of this DH is Catholic (according to canon law) even though he never practiced the faith and didn't really know much about Catholicism before he and I met. This presented us with an interesting situation during our marriage preperation. We were not considered a couple of mixed-faith and did not need to go through all the extra paperwork and classwork that is involved with that circumstance. However, we had many of the same social and spiritual issues that mixed-faith couples do and requested extra counseling to assist with those.

    There are other instances where the different between a Catholic baptism and a Protestant baptism comes into play. So in the Catholic Church at least, yes it does make a difference. I don't know if it does in Protestant churches.
    Gena

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  4. #24
    Gena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamicka View Post
    But the Catholic church also recognizes that a baptism performed in a Protestant church holds no different significance for someone wanting to join a Catholic parish. In other words, someone wanting to join the Catholic church who has been baptized in a Protestant church would not have to be re-baptized in a Catholic church. No?
    No, the person converting with a Protestant baptism would not have to be re-baptized. He/she would go through the conversion classes and receive the sacraments of First Communion and Confirmation. In most cases this would be done at Easter Vigil, after about a year or so of study.

    Many Catholic parishes (not all) offer a faster process throughout the year for people who were baptized Catholic, but did not receive First Communion and Confirmation for various reasons. Church law sees this situation as fundamentally different from conversion from a Protestant faith.
    Gena

    DS, age 11 and always amazing

    “Autistics are the ultimate square pegs, and the problem with pounding a square peg into a round hole is not that the hammering is hard work. It's that you're destroying the peg." - Paul Collins, Not Even Wrong

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gena View Post
    The Catholic Church no longer teaches that unbaptized children go to limbo.
    Depends on how old school your church is . I am sure that it is the official stance but that doesn't mean it still isn't being taught.
    -Melissa
    Mom to M (2002) & M (2014)

  6. #26
    Clarity is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
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    A Methodist church will not baptise your child? I'm surprised by that. Otherwise, I might try a nondenominational christian church or the UU as Beth suggested.
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  7. #27
    Gena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MelissaTC View Post
    Depends on how old school your church is . I am sure that it is the official stance but that doesn't mean it still isn't being taught.
    *sigh* Unfortunately there seems to be no escaping bad catechesis.
    Gena

    DS, age 11 and always amazing

    “Autistics are the ultimate square pegs, and the problem with pounding a square peg into a round hole is not that the hammering is hard work. It's that you're destroying the peg." - Paul Collins, Not Even Wrong

  8. #28
    mamicka is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
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    Thanks Gena, for both your responses. I think I've got it... at least enough to know it's complicated .

  9. #29
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    Yeah; I was baptized in a Lutheran church and raised Lutheran. I started attending a Catholic high school and felt more 'at home' in the Catholic Church, so I converted in high school. I went through the RCIA process (about a year) and was annointed a Catholic at the Easter vigil. There wasn't as much involved since I had been baptized, but I did need to take communion that night and go to confession.
    We baptized DD into the Catholic Church last winter; we went through the same steps as previous posters stated. DD has two godmothers instead of a godmother and godfather, because honestly we don't have any males close to us who we consider religious, church-going, and that are also Catholic. One godmother is Catholic, the other is not, but is a very devout and honorable Christian who I'm proud to have as her godmother. We had a hard time picking godparents because I didn't want to just pick my or DH's siblings 'for show,' as I think a lot of people do (it's kind of what's expected a lot of times). So I may have pissed off some siblings by not picking them, when they had picked me as godmother for their kids, but I don't think they're really religious or church-going and I didn't want to be a hypocrite.
    I agree; I am Catholic but would never think a child would go to hell for not being baptized.
    We have some friends who've had their kids baptized because it's the 'thing to do' (they want to avoid future problems/ roadblocks when the kids are in school). I disagree with that and think that you should baptize your kid knowing full well all the significance of it. I was pretty emotional at DD's baptism; it meant something to me, and I wouldn't want other parents just going through the motions.

  10. #30
    gatorsmom is offline Red Diamond level (10,000+ posts)
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    You should look for a more liberal Catholic parish. Ours is considered pretty liberal and while it did require that we be members to have our DS baptized there (we were new to the area), it didn't matter that my DH was Baptist. They really didn't care. We took a class of a couple of hours to understand the symbolism and the history behind it, signed some papers and that was it. Joining the parish didn't require anything either other than filling out some papers.

    I realize it seems like a pain, but the Catholic Church is pretty strict with its rules. Some see that as annoying but I find it comforting to be affiliated with an institution that doesn't bend it's rules to be popular or trendy. And, btw, if you haven't been to a Catholic Baptism, they are lovely and rich in historic traditions. But I could be biased because we are devout Catholics .
    "It is not 'progressive' to try to resolve problems by eliminating a human life." Pope Francis

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