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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmh2402 View Post


    i am constantly hearing that i "have nothing to worry about" b/c DS is actually really big for his age

    who CARES that he only eats the same 3-5 foods. pureed! (even though he has ALL his teeth)

    really. who cares. right?

    and who cares that he vomits on a fairly regular basis at the very sensation of other foods touching his lips. and gags/retches at the sight of a spoon or fork approaching with any food other than the limited few that he has deemed acceptable.

    neither of my DC are to that degree of gagging, etc. But I too am extremely tired of hearing that my dc are of normal weight, so don't worry. Well, I am worried! Just because they are a normal size does not mean they are getting all the nutrients and vitamins they need to be truly healthy.
    SAHM to Pete and Repeat my "Irish Twins" - DD 12/06 and DS 11/07

    Never argue with an idiot. He'll bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  2. #42
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    Wow, 5 pages! Haven't read through them all, will have to come back. I think a support thread is a great idea! Mhy 5 yo is currently on a hunger strike. (That is a healthy hunger strike- she'll gladly eat all kinds of junk.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Indianamom2 View Post
    In our case (and I personally think many others) DD has sensory issues, so I truly believe that they come into play. She doesn't care for much meat. Certain textures bother her (smooth, thick, chewy, etc.) It's unbelieveably frustrating and I have no answers except to say that I don't always think it's the parents' fault.
    DD also has some sensory sensitivities which contribute to her pickiness. She is sometimes willing to try something, like a raw carrot or cooked chicken but then gags & refuses (or can't) swallow. She will spit her food in the garbage & insist on having her tongue cleaned off.
    Lately she's also been insisting on separate plates for each food. It used to be that they couldn't touch, now they need separate plates & forks. Sigh.

    Quote Originally Posted by mommylamb View Post
    How about letting them pick out what's for dinner (alternating between kids) and having whichever kid chose dinner that day help you cook? That way you can try to find ways of making whatever they want a little healthier and engaging them in the process.
    We've tried this, with some success. DD & I drew up a menu of foods she liked. Of course, these food have little nutritional value. Plain macaroni with ketchup, grilled cheese (rye bread only!).... I try so hard to get a protein into her. Veggies are not even on my radar at this point. I allow her to eat nonfat yogurt with food coloring (uggh!!) cuz that's the only one she'll eat. Or not. She likes green apples lately, so sometimes a green apple will be a breakfast. Or a supper. Pathetic.

    I will say that G-d know which kid to give the allergies to, cuz my milk, egg, sesame, peanut & treenut allergic child happily eats almost anything she's given, including her nasty soy cheese & yogurts! DD1 can't even stand to be in the same room as DD2's cheese (which I agree, stinks!)
    ~Shanamama

    Mommy's girl- 10 years old!!
    Daddy's girl- turning 7!!
    monkey boy- 3 years old now!!

    Wacky typos brought to you by autocorrect.

  3. #43
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    Oh yes, no one listened to me for years, and I mean years, because my son was a big boy. He gets that from my side of the family--line backer size guys who are 6'4"--not because he was eating a well rounded healthy diet.

    But no one took me seriously until I wrote down a list of foods he would eat, brought it into the doctor and showed it to her and said "Look, these are the only foods he will eat. thats it. I am not exaggerating. I did not forget anything or leave anything off. If I try to feed him anything else he has a panic attack and throws up."

    Her response? "so he doesn't eat any fruits or vegetables?" Did you just hear a word I said lady? What have I been saying for years?
    FWIW...we tried different doctors, so it wasn't just her, but because he wasn't skin and bones no one believed me it was so bad.
    Mama to "The Fantastic Four":
    DS 02
    DD 06
    DS 09
    DD 12

  4. #44
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    I haven't had the time to read this entire thread, but wanted to say THANK YOU to all the mamas who have outed themselves as having kids who will eat a very limited number of foods and would rather go to bed hungry than eat fruits, veggies and other items.

    I have super picky kids, and would say that the vast majority of people in my life (grandparents, doctors, even other moms) seem to think this is a failure on the part of the parent, and that if I simply didn't offer any other options they'd eat what I gave them. Um, no. They wouldn't. I've tried. I threw out THOUSANDS of dollars worth of food over the past eight years. One day, I gave up. I refuse to make food that nobody eats.

    So, we eat a lot of organic no nitrate/ite hot dogs. ONE of my three kids will eat chicken nuggets, so she gets Bell & Evans. All three will (miraculously) eat TJs meatballs. One likes bananas. Two like grapes. Two like cheese. Everyone likes egg noodles, so they're a staple. In fact, egg noodles, meatballs and hot dogs might be the only foods that all three of my children will consistently eat. Well, and cake/cookies/candy. Those foods are not a problem at all!

    It feels good to know that I am not alone, and that others share this experience. It can be hard not to feel judged when you have picky eaters.
    Green Tea, mom to three

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green_Tea View Post
    Well, and cake/cookies/candy. Those foods are not a problem at all!
    , totally!
    I was thinking of this thread tonight when DD1 started negotiating about her supper. I had defrosted egg-free chicken hamburgers that I invented a while back and I *knew* there was no way DD1 would go near them. It was late & the kids were tired & I just wanted them fed so they could go to sleep. I didn't even pretend there would be a battle tonight. I pretty much offered DD her 3 favorite foods: a grilled cheese sandwhich, a yogurt or a bowl of oatmeal. She said "Ma, if you make me a grilled cheese sandwhich, I'm telling you, I'm not gonna eat the whole thing. If you want me to eat the whole thing I'll tell you what to make me. A bowl of cereal." This from my five year old. She ate a bowl of whole grain cereal with milk & almost a whole bowl of instant maple & brown sugar oatmeal. Someone mentioned instant oatmeal upthread in shame (I think). AFAI'm concerned, it's a hot (home-cooked?) meal. I prefer whole grain oatmeal from scratch but can't always whip it up at a moment's notice.
    ~Shanamama

    Mommy's girl- 10 years old!!
    Daddy's girl- turning 7!!
    monkey boy- 3 years old now!!

    Wacky typos brought to you by autocorrect.

  6. #46
    mikala is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Anyone hear this on NPR this morning? I had a feeling it elicited a collective groan/face palm from the parents of picky eaters in this thread...

    http://www.npr.org/2011/02/14/133629...ofter-approach

  7. #47
    lovin2shop is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    Support thread is such a great idea! My oldest has nearly led me to pulling my hair out, as he is more accurately described as a "non-eater" rather than picky. I mean there is picky, and then there is PICKY. I've often wished that there was a better medical term, because I definitely feel the judgment and rolled eyes from friends. He has the sensory issue of extreme texture aversion / gag reflex and major anxiety over food. We did therapy (speech and occupational), and sadly enough, didn't really find any of it very helpful.

    It was apparent from infancy with DS#1 that he was going to have eating issues. He never mouthed objects like most babies, and never could get past a Stage 1 fully pureed baby food. To this day, he'll still gag if apple sauce is too chunky! Likewise, I pretty much knew that my younger DS was different almost from birth. He was the more typical baby, that would stare at food on our plates, take bites of things when offered, put toys and random carpet lint in his mouth just to see... He can be picky like a normal toddler with specific wants, but is pretty easily manipulated with the normal Mom rhetoric. So yes, I understand "picky" that is a PITA, and I also understand "PICKY" where it all kinds of tactital and medical intervention.

    So, after 8 years, I have to say that it is a little better now. Not sure if that is much consolation to those of you with little ones. I also find it interesting that my oldest is such an EASY child in all other respects. My little one, well, not so much, so I guess I'll be thankful that my parenting issues were spaced out well!

    Overall, the only thing that ended up making a difference for us was to get DS very involved in cooking. Like almost as a hobby, even though he doesn't always even try what he cooks. We did Young Chef's Academy for awhile, he cooks with me (which I love), we watch Food TV constantly, and he likes to pick out cookbooks as gifts for my birthday, etc. for us to look at together. The cooking involvement was suggested in therapy, but reallly evolved naturally because we both love it. And, I probably make it sound like we are our own little Pillsbury Bake Off, but actually it isn't as often as I would like. I work full time, and struggle to get good meals on the table during the week, but we make a point to do this stuff together as time allows.

    Anyway, what works with one kid may not work with another. But in looking back with perspective over the last 8 years, I let him eat what eats, and in turn, he explores food with me on his terms and in a positive and fun light. Since I have the perspective of time, I can almost look back with gratitude over the bond that this issue has provided for us. I would probably have to grit my teeth to actually say that out loud though!

    He actually tried a few bites of Rainbow Trout last night, seasoned two different ways, to compare which way he liked best. I almost fell out of my chair in shock and wanted to shout it out for all to hear, or at least post a status change on Facebook or something!
    Last edited by lovin2shop; 02-14-2011 at 03:55 PM.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovin2shop View Post
    He actually tried a few bites of Rainbow Trout last night, seasoned two different ways, to compare which way he liked best. I almost fell out of my chair in shock and wanted to shout it out for all to hear, or at least post a status change on Facebook or something!
    Love it! Actually, now that you mention this, the two times I've done "taste tests" the kids have eaten more than they would have otherwise.

    Hmmm... Have to try that again. Still, you can't do it every night.
    -Kate

    Mom to Sally & Leo - 2/20/07

  9. #49
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    Melbel is online now Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Late to this thread because we were out of town, but please sign me up!

    DS and DD1 are overall great eaters, and then there is DD2, my severe reflux baby that is still dealing with yeast issues (another cause of esophagitis). Allergy testing has all been negative, but DH has a peanut allergy and her siblings of asthma/eczema. She is in the 25th percentile for height/weight but has only gained 1 pound in 1.25 years. Her siblings were in the 95%.

    She is not only picky, but sometimes refuses to eat anything at all. Dinner time is her worst meal, which means that she often goes to bed hungry and wakes up wanting a bottle. Yes, she is still taking a bottle for toddler formula (watered down so that she will not throw it up) because she will not drink it in a sippy cup and she needs the nutrition. Her pediatrician and dentist are OK with the bottle with it under the circumstances.

    She has been drinking smoothies, so I am hoping to sneak in some protein and other nutrition. She seems to have some tactile issues with food too, often preferring dry crunchy food (i.e. freeze dried strawberries or vegetables if I am lucky). One day she asked for carrots, so we dashed to the grocery store and let her pick her favorite shape. The smallest things are big accomplishments.

    I guess it is comforting to know that I am not alone in dealing with some serious food issues! I am open to any and all suggestions!

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