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  1. #1
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    Default IEP for "very low IQ" ?

    This question is for DHs coworker, who has asked for help with his son. Coworker adopted 2 little boys (brothers) when they were toddlers. I cannot remember for sure, but I think DH said the birth mother abused drugs during her pregnancies.

    The first child has been diagnosed with ADHD, and after a year of fighting with the school to get him an IEP (yeah, they totally jerked him around and basically lied about their obligations)--he is getting the help and accommodations he needs.

    Now the second brother has been evaluated by a Dr. and found to have "very low IQ". Dr said this most likely means learning disabilities as well. The child is having problems in school both academically and socially. But the school says they don't need to do anything about it, and is denying any further testing or giving him help.

    What can he do?

    Thanks ladies!


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  2. #2
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    A public school in NoVa? That's really shocking. I would point your friend to the wrightslaw.com website.
    Mommy to my wonderful, HEALTHY twin girls
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  3. #3
    wellyes's Avatar
    wellyes is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
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    Intellectual disability applies for kids with IQs in the 70-75 range or below.

    http://nichcy.org/disability/specific/intellectual
    DD - 8
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  4. #4
    JustMe is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    I would recommend he try to find a local advocacy group that works for kids with special needs and schools. There generally is at least one group that is free, although some on this list have pointed out to me that you can get more sometimes if you pay for it.

    Also, he might get some pointers if he contacts the dr who did the eval and asks for suggestions both about what additional testing s/he thinks should be done and what services s/he thinks the child needs.

    Your friend should put all of his concerns/requests for testing/services in writing and get it to the appropriate people at the district asap, even if he has already been told verbally that they will not do anything. I have learned the hard way that if I did not put it in writing, it did not happen.

    Good luck to your friend. I know these are issues that can effect any family, but there are also some that are specific to adoptive families so I can relate. Not sure how old his second son is, but it is not at all unheard of that IQ scores can increase, particularly with an adoptive child who did not have a positive start, with age, education, good nutrition, etc.

    After 3 long years, I finally had an extremely productive meeting for dd and am very hopeful about the services she will receive in the Fall--but that's another post!
    Last edited by JustMe; 06-11-2013 at 10:07 AM.
    lucky single mommy to almost 16 yr old dd and almost 13 yr old ds through 2 very different adoption routes

  5. #5
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    Stupid school district. Another option might be to have him further evaluated by a doctor qualified to make diagnoses and do more extensive testing for things such as ADHD and other learning disorders he may have. We are in NOVA too, and certain diagnoses are an automatic qualifier for an IEP. While a general "may have learning disabilities" may not get them too far with the school district, knowing specific disabilities can. The low IQ could then be a secondary diagnosis, instead of the primary.
    Kelli

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  6. #6
    egoldber's Avatar
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    How old are they? Are they in school? How are they doing in school?

    Even with a diagnosis, if the child is working at grade level, it is very hard get an IEP (vs. a 504 plan) even in NoVA.
    Beth, mom to older DD (8/01) and younger DD (10/06) and always missing Leah (4/22 - 5/1/05)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by egoldber View Post

    Even with a diagnosis, if the child is working at grade level, it is very hard get an IEP (vs. a 504 plan) even in NoVA.
    Quote Originally Posted by daisymommy View Post
    The child is having problems in school both academically and socially. But the school says they don't need to do anything about it, and is denying any further testing or giving him help.
    What I find surprising is they say they don't need to do anything about it or give help. Even a 504 is something. I don't know education law though, maybe that's legal. I know the wrightslaw site has lots of info though.
    Mommy to my wonderful, HEALTHY twin girls
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  8. #8
    egoldber's Avatar
    egoldber is offline Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    The problem is that the standard for an IEP is very hard to meet if your child is on grade level and/or is not having any behavioral issues in the classroom. Schools are only legally obliged to provide services and/or special education to guarantee a child access to an "appropriate education". With special education $$ getting harder to come by, even in NoVA, schools are pushing back when a few years ago they may not have.

    Even a 504 can be hard to get unless there is a demonstrated classroom impact and the accommodations require zero dollars.
    Beth, mom to older DD (8/01) and younger DD (10/06) and always missing Leah (4/22 - 5/1/05)

  9. #9
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    You ladies are all so helpful! Thank you so much for the info.

    He is not working at grade level and the school is already saying he will most likely be held back next year. He is having problems with behavior as well. I don't know what grade he is in--maybe 1st? I'll ask and update here.

    Basically, they want the parents to pay for all testing until they find something medically wrong, then they'll talk about doing an IEP. But I thought schools were required to do some testing?

    Someone mentioned putting their requests in writing and sending it to the appropriate person in the district. Does anyone know what type of title that would be? Who should they be asking to speak to?


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    Last edited by daisymommy; 06-11-2013 at 04:02 PM.
    Mama to "The Fantastic Four":
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  10. #10
    egoldber's Avatar
    egoldber is offline Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    Have his parents requested a formal IEP meeting? In FCPS, you address this request in a letter (it can be an e-mail) to the school counselor who then initiates the process.

    With a diagnosis and being behind enough for the school to want to retain (which is very unusual), honestly that seems like a certain IEP.
    Beth, mom to older DD (8/01) and younger DD (10/06) and always missing Leah (4/22 - 5/1/05)

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