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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    Lisa--just wanted to note..DS has lousy handwriting. We had him evaluated and he needs to do hand and other muscle strengthening exercises. Given all that was going on with the dyslexia, we put that on the back burner. DS is now on grade level with reading and math. And now that he is in 4th grade, they are going to start him on key boarding. He doesn't want to do better with handwriting nor does he want to take the time. His school tutor said (kindly) that it was a waste of time to work with him on it since he knows how to do it but chooses not to do so. So now we are on to key boarding. Which is fine with me. At some point, he will realize that he needs better handwriting and he will buckle down. But key boarding is a necessary skill and is a way around the problem at this point. YMMV!!
    Mom to:
    DS '02
    DD '05
    Simon--the King Charles cutie
    RIP Andy, the furry first child, 1996-2012

    "The task of any religion is not to tell us who we are entitled to hate but to teach us who we are required to love."

  2. #12
    Sweetum is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    Our OT also often tells us that grip and pressure have to do with core issues. She always works with him on writing after some core exercises and some "stimulating" exercises for his hand. I tried that at home as well - have him do some core exercises and then some find motor exercises (like stringing, picking up with tongs) and then do writing and/or coloring. I had much better success at that time. Once he started to get stronger in his core and also once he got the hang of it (the pressure and grip) it started to get better.

  3. #13
    inmypjs is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    My son has moderate to severe dysgraphia. I really think you have to start them on accommodating technology asap, while still continuing to practice. I have completely accepted that DS is not going to use handwriting as his primary mode of output. And that's okay. He still goes to OT to work on it, and other motor issues. Also wanted to say that if you haven't had an OT and/or a COVD (developmental optometrist) evaluate visual processing issues, I would do that. I think my son's handwriting is impacted by his visual processing stuff a lot.

  4. #14
    brittone2 is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullkin View Post
    Our OT also often tells us that grip and pressure have to do with core issues. She always works with him on writing after some core exercises and some "stimulating" exercises for his hand. I tried that at home as well - have him do some core exercises and then some find motor exercises (like stringing, picking up with tongs) and then do writing and/or coloring. I had much better success at that time. Once he started to get stronger in his core and also once he got the hang of it (the pressure and grip) it started to get better.

    I agree with core playing a part for many kids. Obviously, many kids need to work on hand, wrist, and finger muscle strength. However, if there are issues with tone or a weak core, then kids can't get that distal control of their hands. They need a good base of stability in their core before they can have the fine control needed in the hand muscles.

    Handwriting can also be affected by visual processing, bimanual integration (using two hands, as kids need to stabilize the paper w/ one hand in order to write with the other), etc. That's why working with an OT with a focus on handwriting can be a huge help...there is a lot to tease out, as there are so many things that have to come together for kids to write.

    Agree with PPs that HWOT can be very good, and OTs do sometimes adjust various writing grip tools or weighted pencils. There are even tools like weighted gloves. Depending on what the OT is seeing, sometimes they also use weighted vests. Again, the solution is going to come back to the contributing factors, of which there can be many! Some kids probably benefit from doing heavy work prior to sitting down to write, but again, that depends on the cause and what the OT thinks are the major contributing factors.
    Last edited by brittone2; 10-26-2013 at 09:52 AM.
    Mama to DS-2004
    DD-2006
    and a new addition-ds born march 2010

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indiana
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    I'm a bit late to this and you've already gotten some good advice (I may have this issue with Ds...too soon to tell though). I did want to add that kids with SPD can be both sensory seeking and sensory avoiding at the same time. DD craves lots of bouncy off things and firm pressure when she is doing the pressing (she has always tended to be very rough when playing), but can be highly sensitive to very light touch if she isn't anticipating it, as an example. So it's not uncommon to have issues with both things. Frustrating and confusing...huh?
    Christina
    DD 9/04
    DS 7/09

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