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  1. #21
    egoldber's Avatar
    egoldber is offline Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    My older DD takes Prozac for her anxiety. She started taking it when was 9. A very small dose (10 mg) made a HUGE impact on her quality of life.
    Beth, mom to older DD (8/01) and younger DD (10/06) and always missing Leah (4/22 - 5/1/05)

  2. #22
    Gena's Avatar
    Gena is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
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    It's really hard to tell what might be going on at such a young age.

    The language difficulties with autism don't always involve delays. Some kids with autism talk which early and seem to use words that are advanced for their age; but as they get older, it becomes apparent that they have issues with pragmatics (the social use of language) or other language processing problems. Social issues are also difficult to determine in toddlers and may not become clear for a couple of years.

    Additionally, kids can by non-typical in ways other than autism. As others hAve mentioned, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, OCD, and anxiety could also be possibilities.

    Even though your DS may be too young for a diagnosis, you can still try some of the approaches that are used for autism or other disorders. Things like visual schedules and sensory diet might help.
    Gena

    DS, age 11 and always amazing

    “Autistics are the ultimate square pegs, and the problem with pounding a square peg into a round hole is not that the hammering is hard work. It's that you're destroying the peg." - Paul Collins, Not Even Wrong

  3. #23
    JCat is offline Silver level (200+ posts)
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    If possible you should find a good develpmental pediatrician and take him for an evaluation. If it's not autism then it may be something else. You are right though, I do see a lot of kids like what you are descibing at my son's school (he is ASD). Especially the milder cases who have responded well to the therapy. They seem to hold onto those patricular difficulties even after the other symptoms have faded.

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