Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: IEP help

  1. #1
    tabegle is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,004

    Default IEP help

    I've never posted here before, but now that my ds officially qualifies for an IEP, I would love some help, advice, insight, anything.

    DS, 5 yo, is in kindy and is a pretty bright kid, but has issues with controlling his emotions/outbursts/anger to the point an IEP study was done and he qualifies based on his emotional/behavioral deficiencies.

    As part of the recommended IEP, we did not see any educational guidelines listed out. Is that normal? DH and I both feel strongly that while DS is getting the additional support/guidance he needs for emotional, he continues to grow academically.

    For instance, if he is currently testing at 95% of his peers, we want him to still test at or above 95% a year from now. After all, this is an Individualized Education Plan.

    Is this unreasonable? The feedback received so far to this idea has not been welcoming. Again, any advice, suggestions, thoughts, insight, ANYTHING would be appreciated. And if it makes a difference, we live in Illinois.

    TIA!!!

  2. #2
    hillview's Avatar
    hillview is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    20,993

    Default

    The IEP addresses the differences not the areas he is doing well in so yes from what you said I think it's typical. My son has a 504 plan for some behavior but nothing academic. I'd suggest considering a neuropsych eval to understand what's causing the behavioral issues. Good luck!
    DS #1 Summer 05
    DS #2 Summer 07

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4,508

    Default

    I have never heard of guaranteeing a specific testing percentage on an IEP. Bright kids can have scores drop for any number of reasons. Test scores don't really reflect what the child is learning. And, above all else, K level testing is...well, wholly unreliable for predicting future performance. One of many articles explaining why in part: https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...OnMI_blog.html

    So yes, that request is unreasonable.

    I agree with hillview that the best way to help him succeed in the future is to figure out the why behind the behaviors. School testing is not intended to diagnose.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NY.
    Posts
    4,730

    Default

    It's unreasonable. The IEP isn't going to address everything it possibly could. Also the concept of FAPE is an issue...FAPE is a "free and appropriate education". You don't get to use an IEP to support achievement that is well above average.
    DD '06
    DD '14

  5. #5
    Cam&Clay is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    DS2 has an IEP for an emotional disability (anxiety). His IEP addresses only that...his behavior and how he handles his emotions. His academics are well above average but his IEP shouldn't address that.
    DS1 age 21 years
    DS2 age 11 years

  6. #6
    LBW is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    .
    Posts
    2,887

    Default

    Is it possible that some of his outbursts are due to boredom? If so, then you may be able to get some specific accommodations stating that he will be given more challenging work, as needed.
    Tara
    living a crazy life with 3 boys

    In the personal life, there is
    always grief more than enough,
    a heart-load for each of us
    on the dusty road. I suppose
    there is a reason for this, so I will be
    patient, acquiescent. But I will live
    nowhere except here, by Ocean, trusting
    equally in all the blast and welcome
    of her sorrowless, salt self.
    ~Mary Oliver

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    .
    Posts
    837

    Default

    Even if your child was behind peers academically in an area like reading, a typical IEP goal would be for them to be "at grade level in reading" when assessed the next year. The laws don't require them to put the bar higher than grade level for growth.

    I agree though that accommodations would be where you can address some of your concerns, and request that they be giving challenging work if you have seen a pattern of boredom with material leading to behavior issue.

    My bright daughter was at a charter that used ILPs (Individualized Learning Plans) where you were more likely to be able to set academic goals that addressed growth above grade level. Those are optional plans, and very different than IEPs which fall under the IDEA law for educating students with disabilities.

  8. #8
    tabegle is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,004

    Default

    Thanks everyone for your responses. This really helps as I am completely new to navigating this world.

    More information:

    They completely want to remove my son from his current classroom (teacher ratio 1:18) to a class of kids with behavioral kids (ratio up to 1:13) and grade levels of K through 3, and currently (and usually) all boys.

    I do have an upcoming apt with a Pediatric Neurologist, but I'm told it is only supposed to take an hour, so I expect it is more of an initial appointment.

    Since the recommendation is to completely remove him from the general education environment, I am shocked and surprised there is no mention of academics whatsoever in his IEP. Here's an analogy. I have a car with a bad muffler (aka behavior) and I take it to be fixed. They fix the muffler, but now the engine stalls all the time (delayed learning because of no direction on academics). Would that be acceptable to you?

    I just don't want his learning to stagnate in the classroom. Some of his outbursts may indeed stem from being bored. His sister is in 1st and he has enjoyed working on her math homework. (and she's bored too). Frankly, I disappointed in the school system overall. I understand that kids to come into school starting al all levels, but I feel like so much of it is holding back some kids while the others catch up.

    Overall, yes, my son does need some help and he's been in behavioral therapy since December (also when I requested the pediatric behavioral (neurology) appointment that is finally coming up now this month). I suspect he might fall on the ASD. His kindy teach definitely thinks he does (Asperger's) but the schools autism evaluation was one person spending 45 minutes with him one time. And she only works with non-Asperger's cases, so I think that evaluation was crap.

    We are really doing everything we can to help him. The other pediatric behavior place ds' pediatrician recommended we go to, turned us down after I sent in the paperwork because "they don't work with autism cases".

    And if this post isn't rambly enough, the whole IEP meeting felt so patronizing. we walked in there having read some of the evaluations prior and we just felt like they had already had a pre-meeting about what was going to happen. 1) they all already knew what they were going to recommend, 2) it felt like a big sales presentation for the "special classroom". All that was left was to click a few boxes and print out the material for us to sign. They wanted us to sign our first IEP right then and there without having a chance to actually read the material and learn more about our other options.

    I need to make sure I get this right and do what I can to advocate for my kid.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NY.
    Posts
    4,730

    Default

    There should be a student advocacy agency in your area. You could ask the school district for the contact information or locate it yourself. Sometimes it is free but even when it costs money it can be worth it to get an objective and experienced person attending meetings and reviewing paperwork with you.
    DD '06
    DD '14

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    5,330

    Default

    I would not make the move out of a general ed environment without a diagnosis and evaluation from someone outside the school district. If they are making the recommendation for your child's safety or the safety of his peers, you could agree to the placement for the short term but I would make sure that his long term placement is determined after you have had the chance to pursue outside testing and a diagnosis.

    If your child is not struggling academically, it's not surprising that the IEP would not mention academic goals.

    The people at the meeting definitely met ahead of time to review the results of testing and decide on what recommendations they would make. That's par for the course. I understand how it made you feel, though, and I'm sorry.

    I have never heard of a developmental pediatrician that doesn't work with "autism cases" - if you share your general location here, maybe some of the mamas on this board can give you some leads!
    Green Tea, mom to three

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •