Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Fluid in lungs?

  1. #1
    robinsmommy is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    2,150

    Default Fluid in lungs?

    Anyone dealt with this in an elderly parent? MIL is late eighties and I took her to the Dr recently when she complained of shortness of breath. They are dealing with it (diuretic), and ordering more tests and specialists, but the info I get from Google is worrisome.

  2. #2
    hillview's Avatar
    hillview is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    20,947

    Default

    Yes with several relatives. Can go away quickly. Can be pneumonia / require antibiotics. Good luck!
    DS #1 Summer 05
    DS #2 Summer 07

  3. #3
    robinsmommy is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    I don’t think it’s pneumonia. More related to her heart, as they are sending her for cardio stuff.

  4. #4
    NCGrandma is online now Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,493

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by robinsmommy View Post
    I don’t think it’s pneumonia. More related to her heart, as they are sending her for cardio stuff.
    Ignore Dr Google if you can (I know, not always easy). Even if it's heart-related, there are lots of possibilities and the important thing is to figure out which it is. Lots of heart issues can be managed. Make sure, if you can, that all the doctors are communicating with each other, and that they all know about all the meds/supplements etc that she is taking, and that they all know about what other health problems she has. I have several friends and neighbors who have some sort of heart disease that is well controlled and doesn't cause them a lot of limitations.


    Sent from my iPad using Baby Bargains

  5. #5
    robinsmommy is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    I’ll try to hold off on the panic and any more Googling. Hopefully she improves with the diuretics that she starts in the morning. Eldercare is rather humbling. It’s more like parenting than I want to admit, with guilt, worry, and dealing with new things you know nothing about.

    Thanks for the support, I will try to update when we know more.

  6. #6
    rlu is offline Ruby level (4000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    California.
    Posts
    4,685

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NCGrandma View Post
    Make sure, if you can, that all the doctors are communicating with each other, and that they all know about all the meds/supplements etc that she is taking, and that they all know about what other health problems she has. Sent from my iPad using Baby Bargains
    MIL (and all that side of the family) has the handy "flyer" that SIL1 created that lists all major surgeries/events with brief explanation and date; all current medications (type, frequency, strength); contact info; insurance info; (eta: allergic reactions to medications and any other known allergies) and whatever else she thought was useful. MIL takes this to all her doctor's appointments and the offices tend to copy it with her medical card for her records. DH has one SIL1 made for him as well.

    eta: good wishes for OP, meant to start with that!
    DS Mar04, 8th grader. Life Scout. Being read Flash the Homeless Donkey.
    GoldPup (golden retriever born Dec14); Big Boy Dog (1997 - 2008); Little Girl Dog (1997 - 2005); two 10-yo (2007-2017) huge goldfish we can no longer find in MIL's fish pond
    Go Sharks! Go Mirai, Nathan, the Shib Sibs and Team USA
    Recently read The Hate U Give (highly recommend) and The Noel Diary (ok, light). Starting A Dog Named Boo.
    Pooh - "It's a beautiful day." Eeyore - "Not from where I'm sitting." Pooh - "Try standing next to me." From The Best Bear in All the World, Spring.

  7. #7
    pharmjenn is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,076

    Default

    My father (age 86) has Congestive Heart Failure, which sounds like what they are working towards as a diagnosis for your mother. He was diagnosed in Feb 2016 after a massive heart attack, and has only been hospitalized once, for 5 days, after the initial hospitalization. It is a serious condition, and is treated with multiple medications to help the heart beat stronger, and to keep the fluid out of the lungs that gets there due to the heart not pumping well.
    Many people live fairly normal lives, just need to monitor their diet more (as with many diseases)
    mom to Billy 12/07

  8. #8
    robinsmommy is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pharmjenn View Post
    My father (age 86) has Congestive Heart Failure, which sounds like what they are working towards as a diagnosis for your mother. He was diagnosed in Feb 2016 after a massive heart attack, and has only been hospitalized once, for 5 days, after the initial hospitalization. It is a serious condition, and is treated with multiple medications to help the heart beat stronger, and to keep the fluid out of the lungs that gets there due to the heart not pumping well.
    Many people live fairly normal lives, just need to monitor their diet more (as with many diseases)
    Thank you. If you look only at the diagnosis part it can look rather grim. Knowing that it is serious but may be manageable really helps.

    Didn’t hear from specialists today, so I will be calling tomorrow. I will update when we have news, if nothing else so when someone hears “shortness of breath” from a parent, they know more than we did.

  9. #9
    mom2binsd is online now Diamond level (5000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    8,573

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by robinsmommy View Post
    Thank you. If you look only at the diagnosis part it can look rather grim. Knowing that it is serious but may be manageable really helps.

    Didn’t hear from specialists today, so I will be calling tomorrow. I will update when we have news, if nothing else so when someone hears “shortness of breath” from a parent, they know more than we did.
    I work in geriatric rehab, in nursing homes, and what you are describing is pretty common, especially at that age. CHF, Copd, and many other illnesses can sound very scary, but can be completely manageable. Ask lots of questions and I like what someone else mentioned, start keeping a diary with the names of doctors, what tests have been run, medications etc.

    Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •