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  1. #11
    Kindra178 is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    I donít think a year is shocking in a child to go from no glasses to glasses.




    Sent from my iPhone using Baby Bargains

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reader View Post
    Thanks. I was kind of shocked the ophthalmologist would say that about an optometrist. I thought they worked together all the time, and I thought most people went to optometrists to get exams so I was surprised to hear him ask if we'd ever been to a real doctor to have an eye exam.
    As a PP said, they sometimes do have turf wars but plenty of offices work together. I go to an opthamologist for an eye exam and as part of the visit they send me to the optometrist across the hall for the glasses prescription. I make 1 appt and see both for my yearly exam
    dd1 10/05
    dd2 11/09
    and 2 cocker spaniels

  3. #13
    squimp is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Ophthalmologists are good with things like sudden or major problems, so I think it's good that you saw an opthalmologist to rule out any big problems with eye health after the infection and sudden onset of squinting.

    We were told to come in immediately when DD's vision suddenly changed, the pediatrician was actually worried that it was some kind of neurological problem. But it was a super common kid eye issue (far sighted) that was accelerated by a change in schools and interest in reading (staring at books and focusing). So glad we saw a pediatric ophthalmologist for that!

    I agree that there can be turf, especially regarding vision therapy promoted by some optometrists. But honestly optometrists often have more experience with prescriptions and fitting glasses. Different roles.

  4. #14
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    KpbS is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Not sure the age of your DS but our eye doctor said it is very common for kids with excellent/normal vision to experience vision changes between the ages of 10/11. I wouldnít worry if he doesnít show any other signs of infection/problems.

  5. #15
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    btw, fwiw, my vision was fine until 3rd grade. Then suddenly, it wasnt. And it got bad FAST I had script changes every 3-4 months for a year and it went from 20/20 to 20/400 in a year(!) I was convinced it was never going to stop and I'd be blind. But then it stabilized. My drs said it was normal. dd2 started wearing glasses this year in 3rd and her dr also told me to keep an eye out b/c the rx might need to be changed. You did not do anything wrong.
    dd1 10/05
    dd2 11/09
    and 2 cocker spaniels

  6. #16
    JustMe is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    My ds had perfect vision until he was 12. Now he is very near-sighted. We use an excellent optometrist and have been seeing him for years. Once he referred me to an opthamologist when he felt the consult was necessary, but this optometrist knows his stuff and I completely trust him. He says it is very common.
    lucky single mommy to almost 16 yr old dd and almost 13 yr old ds through 2 very different adoption routes

  7. #17
    lizzywednesday is offline Red Diamond level (10,000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reader View Post
    Thanks. I was kind of shocked the ophthalmologist would say that about an optometrist. I thought they worked together all the time, and I thought most people went to optometrists to get exams so I was surprised to hear him ask if we'd ever been to a real doctor to have an eye exam.
    For most people, an optometrist is going to be just fine.

    Opthalmologists are also MDs and can do surgery. I usually associate them with caring for people with diseases of the eye - my mother took me to her opthalmologist when I was a kid because that's where she went. Mom has vision loss as a result of toxoplasmosis and prefers not to see an optometrist.
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    "Make mistakes! Get messy!" - Miss Frizzle

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by doberbrat View Post
    btw, fwiw, my vision was fine until 3rd grade. Then suddenly, it wasnt. And it got bad FAST I had script changes every 3-4 months for a year and it went from 20/20 to 20/400 in a year(!) I was convinced it was never going to stop and I'd be blind. But then it stabilized. My drs said it was normal. dd2 started wearing glasses this year in 3rd and her dr also told me to keep an eye out b/c the rx might need to be changed. You did not do anything wrong.
    Thanks, I needed to hear that. I really felt guilty because I didn't know it could change so fast. Nobody else in the family wears glasses so it wasn't on our radar after the vision exam didn't reveal any issues, and we didn't notice anything until he had pink eye. I'm shocked to hear yours changed so fast. Did it stay constant through your teens/adulthood?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reader View Post
    Thanks, I needed to hear that. I really felt guilty because I didn't know it could change so fast. Nobody else in the family wears glasses so it wasn't on our radar after the vision exam didn't reveal any issues, and we didn't notice anything until he had pink eye. I'm shocked to hear yours changed so fast. Did it stay constant through your teens/adulthood?
    The change persists through the teen years/early adulthood then tends to slow down. Some peopleís vision will be a lot worse, some will actually see ďOKĒ without glasses. The change is prescription wonít be frequent in adulthood, you can go years and years with no change. Then there is a sweet spot where your friends started getting far sighted with age, but it feels like your vision improves slightly. Plus, you can always cheat and take your glasses of to see things close up your up to now perfect vision spouse canít. Then it finally tips over and you are into the world of expensive progressive lenses.

    I donít know much about the corrective contacts because they did not exist when so was young. Iím very near sighted and itís annoying. It Is no fun not to see the alarm clock at night unless you get up close. Iíve never found my vision as good with contacts as glasses. Especially not at my age with near and far sighted. I never got laser surgery do to expense and the possible side effects. But hey, I really can read a lot of things my husband canít, even with his glasses if I just take him home of mine and hold something close. Which is why I donít need the big phone like him.

  10. #20
    MSWR0319 is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogmom View Post
    The change persists through the teen years/early adulthood then tends to slow down. Some peopleís vision will be a lot worse, some will actually see ďOKĒ without glasses. The change is prescription wonít be frequent in adulthood, you can go years and years with no change. Then there is a sweet spot where your friends started getting far sighted with age, but it feels like your vision improves slightly. Plus, you can always cheat and take your glasses of to see things close up your up to now perfect vision spouse canít. Then it finally tips over and you are into the world of expensive progressive lenses.

    I donít know much about the corrective contacts because they did not exist when so was young. Iím very near sighted and itís annoying. It Is no fun not to see the alarm clock at night unless you get up close. Iíve never found my vision as good with contacts as glasses. Especially not at my age with near and far sighted. I never got laser surgery do to expense and the possible side effects. But hey, I really can read a lot of things my husband canít, even with his glasses if I just take him home of mine and hold something close. Which is why I donít need the big phone like him.
    Yes! I just had this conversation with our eye dr a few weeks ago. My eyes changed often in my teen years until they finally settled into a prescription with a few slight changes in my late 20s and haven't changed since then. She did tell me that I'm getting to the age where my vision may get better for a bit. OP, DS is 10 and just got glasses. She's told us all along that this is the age it would start happening. According to what I've been told, kids start out slightly farsighted and then slowly work toward 20/20 around 4th grade. Once they hit that mark, you hope they stay there. But this is the age where it can start to fall the other direction and glasses are needed. She told me it can be quick changes as well and to bring him back if he has problems before his next yearly check.

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