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  1. #1
    JustMe is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Default Is is common for a trainer/coach to be part of causing an injury?

    I know I have been posting a lot of complaint-related issues lately, so I debated posting this. I decided to go ahead and post, as I really do want to know how common this is; I did not do sports as a child, so am often baffled by what the culture and expectations are for kids and sports.

    Dd is 16 and is doing high school cheer; this is her first year. I am very proud of her as they only chose 10 girls total for the team. Eight are returning members, and dd is one of only two new members. Well, they had a "camp" which basically consisted of 2 days of training/practice with some person who came from another state, cost a lot of money, etc. The girls were asked to do some kind of sitting down straddle, which dd was doing, and this trainer came around and pushed her down further. Dd heard a pop, felt hurt, and then all decided she needed to sit out for the rest of the camp. That was over a week ago, and she still has pain, so the regular school trainer sent us off to an outside doctor'/specialist. She has a pulled hamstring muscle. I know that it could be so much worse, but the doctor still recommends she sit out of cheer for at least a month, and do weekly physical therapy. I called around and no PTs have appointments until about a month. I feel bad for dd (who is actually having a very positive attitude) and honestly one more appt to get her to is not what I need right now (that's just a little BP related content- I will get here there, no she cannot get there herself).

    As I said, I am grateful the injury is not worse and, unrelated to cheer dd has had concussions, had her foot run over, has some other issues we are trying to get to the bottom of...so I know this is so minor. I also have no interest in complaining, following up, taking any other action against the trainer about this. I just genuinely want to know if this kind of thing is common as I feel frustrated that dd was pushed past where she should have been by someone who was supposed to be an expert. Is this just part of being a sports-parent? I know injuries are, but I am specifically talking about being pushed (in this case physically and literally) passed where the athlete/kid should be in a way that creates the injury.
    lucky single mommy to almost 16 yr old dd and almost 13 yr old ds through 2 very different adoption routes

  2. #2
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    My DS does parkour and has for over a year now. Never has he been pushed past his ability by a coach. They encourage him to push himself, but never past where he is comfortable or safe.

    I would have expected an expert guest coach to err on the side of caution especially with athletes she is unfamiliar with. But maybe it’s different in cheerleading? I know that can be very competitive but still - that situation does not seem normal or acceptable to me. I know you said you have no interest in following up or complaining about the expert coach, but I would really consider saying something.


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  3. #3
    mom2binsd is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    I did gymnastics in the 80s, the coaches would hold our legs over our heads while we were lying down, 80% of the girls had tears running down their faces, my mom walked in and said, we're done and I only continued to compete in figure skating.

    The coach should not have pushed on her to that extent, I would absolutely let her current coach how the injury happened. Cheer is one of the worst sports for injuries, hopefully she is able to get PT soon.

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  4. #4
    squimp is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    In cheer and dance, there are some high expectations about flexibility. I injured myself in dance several times stretching too hard. Hamstring injuries hurt a lot and take a long time to heal - it's a good idea to go to PT, I never did.

    But I was never pushed by a teacher. In gymnastics I think the expectations are even higher, and cheer can be more driven by gymnastics traditions in some areas, which can be unhealthy.

    My kiddo has played club sports for years now and has never been hurt by a coach like that. To me, it sounds like the coach did something wrong. The job of the trainers and coaches is to keep kids healthy and safe. It would be hard for me not to say something, just to keep them from hiring that team again.

  5. #5
    robinsmommy is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    I remember seeing a video with a similar situation a year or so back, where girls were forced, complaining and in pain, into splits. I’d be calling school admin for sure. They should know better. I am guessing this type of thing used to be common, but it shouldn’t be any more, especially after that last news cycle- I think that made CNN. Splits and similar positions should never be forced. They take a long, long time to build up to. Someone needs to put a stop to this “trainer.”


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/25/u...eo-denver.html
    Last edited by robinsmommy; 09-08-2019 at 01:38 PM.

  6. #6
    JustMe is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Thanks for the replies!

    So, the regular coach just graduated dd's high school 2 years ago and was on the cheer team. Its been clear to me she is a "new" coach, and I wouldn't necessarily count on her being helpful. She was present during the camp, but not 100% sure if she knows the injury happened as a result of dd being pushed (literally and physically) further. Also, last year my dd was touched in appropriately by a peer during school swim team (I posted about that here) and the district athletic coordinator was the opposite of helpful, so I really hesitate about going to him.

    Interesting that cheer is one of the worst sports for injuries. I am struggling majorly with cheer for multiple issues, but I feel it is still dd's choice if she wants to do it at this point. As I said, the coach/trainer who caused it was only there for this one camp, so will not be involved anymore (if he is, I would know as it will be something I would have to pay extra for).

    Also, some of you may know that I struggled a lot with the general school admin based on both dd's special needs/IEP not being accommodated and a sexual assault (separate from what I mentioned about the swim team issue) at school that was not dealt with well or according to laws/guidelines...so not sure who I would/should talk to about this or if its how I should spend my energy.
    Last edited by JustMe; 09-08-2019 at 01:43 PM.
    lucky single mommy to almost 16 yr old dd and almost 13 yr old ds through 2 very different adoption routes

  7. #7
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    Well, as a medical professional I have to say I am not impressed my most trainers and coaches knowledge of the human body. For example, there is no reason ever for a student athlete to die of heat exhaustion, yet somehow it happens just about every year in football training to at least one kid. A lot of it is a bad mix of culture, adherence to how they were trained years ago, a poor understanding of physiology, and lack of adequate training. So I think then less lethal stuff you describe is pretty common. I agree with you, it’s probably not worth doing anything about given everything else going on. When she does go to PT it might be worth it to describe the incident to the PT and ask what they think and what they would suggest your DD do if she found her self in similar situation. Unfortunately “my PT has told me not to push myself like that” will have more weight than your daughter saying “I don’t feel comfortable with this”.

    PS-It’s just not this level of athletics, it can be pros. Take a look into Tom Brady’s quack of a trainer.

  8. #8
    JustMe is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Thanks, this is very helpful.

    One question to anyone who knows anything about hamstring strain--and I understand no one here is in a position to give actual medical advice. The dr said "sideline cheering only"; I asked a few questions and thought I had an idea of what was okay vs not. However, what about running? They run a few laps around the track as warm up. Dd has not complained about this and states "I just keep my leg bent", but not sure if she should be doing that or not. I am unlikely to be able to ask the dr until our next appt one month out, so any opinions about this will be taken as opinions only and be much appreciated.
    thanks
    lucky single mommy to almost 16 yr old dd and almost 13 yr old ds through 2 very different adoption routes

  9. #9
    gymnbomb is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMe View Post
    Thanks, this is very helpful.

    One question to anyone who knows anything about hamstring strain--and I understand no one here is in a position to give actual medical advice. The dr said "sideline cheering only"; I asked a few questions and thought I had an idea of what was okay vs not. However, what about running? They run a few laps around the track as warm up. Dd has not complained about this and states "I just keep my leg bent", but not sure if she should be doing that or not. I am unlikely to be able to ask the dr until our next appt one month out, so any opinions about this will be taken as opinions only and be much appreciated.
    thanks
    If she is not able to run normally she should not be running. Compensating for the injury (by keeping her leg bent) will greatly increase her chance of injuring something else.


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  10. #10
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    She should hold off on running until PT evaluate her. Hamstring injuries are common in running.

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