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  1. #11
    klwa is offline Ruby level (4000+ posts)
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    I'm going to go on the opposite side from what most are saying. I think that where you go to school influences where you will end up. As PP mentioned, you've gotten connections, etc. in your field through school and those are generally going to be in the general area that the school is in. With that said, obviously there are those who move away. But, at my office, better than 50% of the engineers here went to the same university I did, which is about 10 miles from our door.
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  2. #12
    m4nash is offline Silver level (200+ posts)
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    I think it definitely makes it easier to get a job in the part of the country you want to live in by graduating from a school in that region. However if a school has a good national reputation and a large alumni base for whatever program he completes, then there will likely be recruiters looking to that school from across the nation. Whereas if they are only well known regionally/locally, then the recruiters will most likely just be from that region/area and to find jobs outside of that region/locality will be the onus of the graduate.

    I went to state school with a good reputation for engineering nationally and an excellent reputation regionally and most recruiters, even from large international companies, came to our school to fill job openings in the region our school was located in, partly because historically most students wanted to stay in that region. I had friends who attended very small liberal arts schools that were not widely known outside of the states they were located in and they had a much more difficult time finding jobs outside of the closest metropolitan areas to their schools. Their schools also didn't bring in many recruiters or have nearly as many alumni across the country. They had to job hunt on their own, which was made much more difficult by the recession.

  3. #13
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    I think it also depends on your major. DH and I both attended undergrad and grad school in Virginia. We have lived in 5 different states but Virginia for only one year.

    He was a research chemist then manager for about 13 years for a major chemical company before being poached by a biotech startup. We have moved many times and it hasn't been easy but the only way to make it up the chain. I would love to be closer to family, but there is no work for him there.

  4. #14
    JustMe is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    I live across the country from where I grew up and where I went to college ( I went to college 5 hours away from where I grew up). The most important way my college influenced where I live was that that I learned I did not want to live in an overwhelmingly conservative area, and that was not even something on my radar before college.

    BTW, my oldest is definitely going to community college. Not sure about the younger one yet.
    lucky single mommy to almost 16 yr old dd and almost 13 yr old ds through 2 very different adoption routes

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray7694 View Post
    My ds is a sophomore in high school and picking a college is very overwhelming. He states he doesn’t want to live in IL once he graduate college. He loves nature but is also planning to major in computer science.

    My question is do you think it’s important to go to school where you hope to live/work. I know it’s not imperative but would love your thoughts. I have lived in IL my whole life and hate the weather but our jobs don’t allow a move.

    What areas do you think are good for COL and nature but not in the middle of nowhere.

    TIA
    I think this "depends" - I ended up back in the same city as my alma mater but I love the area. It can be a big factor if a center is near your school for job opportunities. In your instance, it is huge if you go to NC State to have opportunities in the tech world in nearby RDU.


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  6. #16
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    I think it depends what city/state. I'd say that most people who come to CA for college end up staying in the state. And most of the CA people I know who went out of state for college ended up moving back to CA afterwards, but I'd agree that it may have to do more with family being here. DH is from CT and had zero desire to move back to the east coast after attending college in Los Angeles. We did go to VA for him to go to law school but moved right back to CA as soon as he graduated due to more job opportunities being here and my mom being here as well.

    DS1 is in 11th grade and wants to stay in the west for college. We are not looking at schools based on future jobs. The most important things we are looking at are cost, school size, and areas of study. DS1's wish list includes small to medium sized school, the option to study abroad in Japan, the ability to continue rock climbing, and the availability of a minor in both computer science and Japanese.

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  7. #17
    lizzywednesday is offline Red Diamond level (10,000+ posts)
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    For me, choosing a college was dependent on where I could get the most financial aid. At the time, this meant a public university in-state. I chose one that was far enough away for me to feel independent but close enough that I knew that I could come home on the weekends if I wanted/needed to.

    My post-college job was located in NYC (with a planned move to Newark, NJ shortly after I started), but I'd never intended to move to NYC.

    I did end up living in the same city where my college is for a couple of years after graduation, but that's partly because it's located on a major rail line, which made getting to work easier when I didn't have a car. (I was also living with my friend who'd gotten a job at one of the local hospitals; our apartment was just about 2 blocks away.)

    DH and I bought our house based on the locations of our jobs at the time - neither of us wanted to drive further than an hour.
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  8. #18
    arivecchi is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
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    No relationship in my experience - especially if one attends non state schools. Iíd look at college location as part of the experience one is looking for as opposed to a place to settle.


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