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  1. #11
    Melaine is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
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    I love Charleston SC as well. It is absolutely beautiful. For our state, itís what I would call HCOL but probably still low compared to the rest of the country.

  2. #12
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    I would say your top 2 decisions are:
    1. How much cold/heat can you take? Mountain states are beautiful, but it is below 32 degrees a LOT. On the flip side, St. George Utah is beautiful but 105 all summer is not something I want to do.
    2. How much humidity can you take? Having lived on the East Coast (Pennsylvania) for half my life, I can say that I really do not ever want to go back. I just loathe humidity. It does make for a beautiful landscape--I love spring on the East Coast. But, ugh, the hot humid summers are too much for me--I really could not take living in North Carolina even. Even the bedsheets feel wet to me. shudder. (not to mention ticks and fleas)

    So you have to figure out what your range is--knowing that nowhere is perfect :-)
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  3. #13
    SnuggleBuggles is offline Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by StantonHyde View Post
    I would say your top 2 decisions are:
    1. How much cold/heat can you take? Mountain states are beautiful, but it is below 32 degrees a LOT. On the flip side, St. George Utah is beautiful but 105 all summer is not something I want to do.
    2. How much humidity can you take? Having lived on the East Coast (Pennsylvania) for half my life, I can say that I really do not ever want to go back. I just loathe humidity. It does make for a beautiful landscape--I love spring on the East Coast. But, ugh, the hot humid summers are too much for me--I really could not take living in North Carolina even. Even the bedsheets feel wet to me. shudder. (not to mention ticks and fleas)

    So you have to figure out what your range is--knowing that nowhere is perfect :-)
    I donít love humidity but at least itís only a few months of the year. What I canít deal with is Bay Area dampness. Maybe itís just my brotherís homes but every place theyíve lived has been chilly and with this constantly damp feel. I think the chilly temps make the damp hard to take. The heat makes the humidity gross and swampy but I can handle it better.


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  4. #14
    squimp is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    I guess itís all relative but I wouldnít consider Portland Oregon affordable. It has had a lot of growth and it seems expensive to me in part because of the California migrants. I donít know what you mean exactly by pretty, but western Colorado is very nice. If I could move anywhere I would probably move to Grand Junction itís just gorgeous there although cold in the winter Iím sure. It seems like you should narrow down the climate. Arizona and New Mexico are also beautiful, and the climate might be a little warmer for you. Lots of beautiful places to live in the west, but you want to figure out what kind of climate you can deal with.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnuggleBuggles View Post
    I don’t love humidity but at least it’s only a few months of the year. What I can’t deal with is Bay Area dampness. Maybe it’s just my brother’s homes but every place they’ve lived has been chilly and with this constantly damp feel. I think the chilly temps make the damp hard to take. The heat makes the humidity gross and swampy but I can handle it better.


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    And Pennsylvania was humid in the summer but then 40 degrees and wet cold in the winter. Like you could never get warm. brrr. I will take dry and 10 degrees any day over that!! ITA on San Fran being damp and chilly.
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  6. #16
    Kestrel is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
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    It's all a matter of what you like. Parts of Utah are beautiful in a kind of harsh way. The woods of Idaho are too, in a different way. I personally love Forks, WA and the surrounding area's forestland, but it rains a TON! (This was setting for the 'Twilight' movies because it's overcast so much.) I visit Forks a lot. We lived for years in Skagit County, WA which is a farming valley which grows both food and some of the most gorgeous tulips in the world - miles and miles of fields of flowers in the spring. (You can google search for Skagit Tulip festival photos.)

    Beauty is in the eye of each of us!

  7. #17
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    I think it al boils down to climate for you, and thatís a steep step considering youíre already living in one of best climate scenarios by anyone standards. Minus the smog/fire risks though!

    Iíve always loved the idea of living in Colorado, but donít think I can handle living in retirement and older years. 20 years ago, sure! Arizona and NM is lovely and some areas within the state is COL, especially after southern CA. NC/SC for East Coast seem to be another good area if you can tolerate the humidity.


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  8. #18
    mom2binsd is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    I would also look at proximity to family as well as culture. I know OP has family in Utah and is LDS, Salt Lake City and it's suburbs is not low COL, but it's not as bad as Socal. I have lived in San Diego and Salt Lake City. Utah has winter yes, but it's not winter like Minnesota, and the skiing and other winter activities help a lot. Summer is nice there, not too much humidity. Being close to family would be a bonus.

    Other parts of the state, especially Southern Utah are pretty too.

    You will never find the ideal temps of where you currently are (except if you are a person like me who missed real seasons, lots of green trees and winter).

    Southern states like NC and SC might fit what you are looking for.

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  9. #19
    hbridge is online now Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    We are doing this now also, but want a northern location: Vermont, Maine, Montana, Oregon, Washington State, Southern Alaska...

    One decision we are factoring in is how rural we are willing to go. We live in a town without pizza delivery and only one store that sells groceries, but I am not willing to go too much further into the "middle of nowhere". Even DH who grew up RURAL is thinking the same. We were looking at a community over the summer (close to where DH grew up). He was really excited about it until I asked where the closest grocery store was... 45 minutes, Whole Foods was an hour, and Trader Jos even farther. As he told me you could see him rethinking things.

  10. #20
    mom2binsd is offline Diamond level (5000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbridge View Post
    We are doing this now also, but want a northern location: Vermont, Maine, Montana, Oregon, Washington State, Southern Alaska...

    One decision we are factoring in is how rural we are willing to go. We live in a town without pizza delivery and only one store that sells groceries, but I am not willing to go too much further into the "middle of nowhere". Even DH who grew up RURAL is thinking the same. We were looking at a community over the summer (close to where DH grew up). He was really excited about it until I asked where the closest grocery store was... 45 minutes, Whole Foods was an hour, and Trader Jos even farther. As he told me you could see him rethinking things.
    Let me put in a vote for Vermont, I went to grad school in Burlington, if you can find a spot within 45 minutes of Burlington you will be close to plenty but feel far removed from the busy world.

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