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  1. #31
    California is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    Our state schools, once you count in room and board, are $25-$35K per year to attend. Are you in an area where the state schools are cheaper than that? If they are around the same price, you may find that private schools offer enough merit to match the public tuition. That would widen up your DS' choices.

    Many colleges have net price calculators on their websites, some post their merit scholarship requirements, and you can also look on the CollegeConfidential website to get an idea of what past merit a college has offered.

    DS researched the premed programs at all the schools he was most interested in. He asked about their premed advising programs, the number of students who start on the premed track vs the number who go on to a med school, and asked about premed opportunities for research and clinical work. This helped him get a good feel for what he wanted at a school. I think he also looked up schools on Reddit and found groups on there to get some insights from current students. This would be something your DS could look into once he identifies a few colleges that he's interested in.

    I have two close family members who are doctors in their mid 30's, and they love their jobs. One works at a UC, and the other is at an innovate private practice. They've talked with my DS about their professions and he did adjust his plans a bit on their recommendations. He also has identified a backup career path and is not a biology major. So, we'll see what happens! It's hard that teenagers have to decide early on if they want to be on a premed track, to make sure they get in all the required courses.

  2. #32
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    Just following up to say that my husband and his colleagues love their jobs, they are specialized surgeons in an academic medical center. Being a pa/np is great for flexible schedule, there is lots of patient contact and opportunities for advancement on the administrative side — current president of his hospital system is a np. But if your child is interested in being the person being ultimately responsible for the really complicated cases, a md makes the most sense.

  3. #33
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    Just following up to say that my husband and his colleagues love their jobs, they are specialized surgeons in an academic medical center. Being a pa/np is great for flexible schedule, there is lots of patient contact and opportunities for advancement on the administrative side — current president of his hospital system is a np. But if your child is interested in being the person being ultimately responsible for the really complicated cases, a md makes the most sense.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by westwoodmom04 View Post
    Just following up to say that my husband and his colleagues love their jobs, they are specialized surgeons in an academic medical center. Being a pa/np is great for flexible schedule, there is lots of patient contact and opportunities for advancement on the administrative side — current president of his hospital system is a np. But if your child is interested in being the person being ultimately responsible for the really complicated cases, a md makes the most sense.
    Yes, my husband (specialty oncology field) loves his job. He is encouraging DD to be an MD over PA. We think DD might like orthopedics since she’s an athlete, very strong, and it’s a male dominated field and she’s the type who wants to break barriers.
    DD (3/06)
    DS1 (7/09)
    DS2 (8/13)

  5. #35
    kdeunc is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
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    DS1 is a high school senior who wants to go to med school. Recent advice from a few drs my DH works with, don't plan on getting in right out of undergrad, a major other than biology may set you apart in a good way, get excellent grades and patient care experience. He is attending a state school (UNC-Chapel Hill) and we will certainly encourage him to apply to in-state med schools as well.
    Kelly

    DS 1 12-02
    DS 2 12-04
    DD 07-08

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by westwoodmom04 View Post
    Just following up to say that my husband and his colleagues love their jobs, they are specialized surgeons in an academic medical center. Being a pa/np is great for flexible schedule, there is lots of patient contact and opportunities for advancement on the administrative side — current president of his hospital system is a np. But if your child is interested in being the person being ultimately responsible for the really complicated cases, a md makes the most sense.
    Yes, my husband (specialty oncology field) loves his job. He is encouraging DD to be an MD over PA. We think DD might like orthopedics since she’s an athlete, very strong, and it’s a male dominated field and she’s the type who wants to break barriers.
    DD (3/06)
    DS1 (7/09)
    DS2 (8/13)

  7. #37
    basil is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
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    I'm an MD (academic surgical subspecialist), my DH is MD as well (internal med subspecialist). I advise med students frequently, though not often undergrads and never HS students.

    Unfortunately I don't have a ton to say on the advising side (i.e. which colleges to go to, which majors to choose, etc.) cause I normally see kids once they are already in med school/residency. But if you want more info on what a medical career is like, what the future of medicine may hold, and MD/DO vs NP/PA, then PM me.
    DS- 8/11
    DD- 5/14

  8. #38
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    When I was growing up, medical school was the big thing if you wanted to make a lot of money in a STEM field, but now I find engineering seems to be more lucrative almost immediately with less investment. Comp sci is all the rage!
    Just an observation… we do need skilled doctors, esp with an aging population, so I hope talented and motivated kids will still decide to take the effort.

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