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  1. #11
    AnnieW625's Avatar
    AnnieW625 is offline Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnuggleBuggles View Post
    6 weeks! Wow! So we kept our existing tub and footprint so just needed to find and fix the crazy leak, put the ceiling back together, tile, new cabinet, sink, vanity, and toilet. Project was done in 9 days.
    It was done pretty fast in my book. Cabinets had to be custom made though, and of course contractors double book jobs so we knew we wouldnít be getting someone who could just work on our job. Oh they also replaced the plumbing pipes in the tub area so that took a good 2-3 days, shower tiling was about a week, floor tiling was two to three days, toilet install and repiping the rest of the plumbing was another 2-3 days. Install of everything else and painting after the cabinets went in was about a week.

    The girls bathroom refresh except for cutting the countertops (which were same slab as our bathroom so we had to wait until the master counters were cut to install counters in the girls bathroom) was a about a week to install flooring, vanity, repaint, and install lights. The girls were without a sink for about 6 weeks.


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    Annie
    WOHM to two wonderful little girls born in April
    DD E, 15
    DD L, 11
    baby 2, 4-2009 (our Tri-18 baby)

  2. #12
    hwin708 is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
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    Agreed with others that while you don't need to have your fixtures picked out, you do need to have a pretty good design sense of what you want. Do you want a curbless shower, do you want a frameless glass enclosure, do you want a freestanding or built-in tub, do you want wall-mounted or deck-mounted faucets? Those play a pretty big part in a contractor quote, and even just their feedback on what is possible, what they are personally capable of (because one contractors "it can't be done" is another's "I do it all the time"), and what will be a huge expense.

    I would also suggest researching questions to be prepared to ask the contractors. A BIG one for me is what waterproofing they use in the shower. So many (so so so many) contractors say they "of course" waterproof the shower, but what they mean is they use cement board, and they are still clinging to outdated ideas about that being waterproof. It's not, and code does not accept it was such. Get specifics from them on what they do to waterproof, and be prepared to google afterwards to see if it's acceptable. Mold growing behind the walls is the number one issue in bathrooms, and the most important thing to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak, amongst contractors. My number two question would be do they use the same tile person on each job, and do they have examples of their work. There is a huge range of quality with tile work, and this is something that can really taint your appreciation of the finished product forever if it is not done right. Every crooked grout line will be all you can see.
    #BidenHarris2020 ďItís easier to be a parent this morning. Itís easier to be a dad. Itís easier to tell your kids character matters. It matters. Telling the truth matters. Being a good person matters.Ē

  3. #13
    Liziz is offline Emerald level (3000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwin708 View Post
    Agreed with others that while you don't need to have your fixtures picked out, you do need to have a pretty good design sense of what you want. Do you want a curbless shower, do you want a frameless glass enclosure, do you want a freestanding or built-in tub, do you want wall-mounted or deck-mounted faucets? Those play a pretty big part in a contractor quote, and even just their feedback on what is possible, what they are personally capable of (because one contractors "it can't be done" is another's "I do it all the time"), and what will be a huge expense.

    I would also suggest researching questions to be prepared to ask the contractors. A BIG one for me is what waterproofing they use in the shower. So many (so so so many) contractors say they "of course" waterproof the shower, but what they mean is they use cement board, and they are still clinging to outdated ideas about that being waterproof. It's not, and code does not accept it was such. Get specifics from them on what they do to waterproof, and be prepared to google afterwards to see if it's acceptable. Mold growing behind the walls is the number one issue in bathrooms, and the most important thing to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak, amongst contractors. My number two question would be do they use the same tile person on each job, and do they have examples of their work. There is a huge range of quality with tile work, and this is something that can really taint your appreciation of the finished product forever if it is not done right. Every crooked grout line will be all you can see.
    This is all really helpful information, thank you all!

    hwin -- very good tip about waterproofing and that cement board doesn't cut it. What AM I looking for here?

    In terms of getting better ideas about what we want - what is everyone's best suggestions for how to research that? We only have very vague ideas at this point. Someone mentioned Houzz, so I'll be checking that out. What else have you done? Just visited supply stores? Other online outlets to look at?

    Thank you!
    Lizi

  4. #14
    SnuggleBuggles is online now Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    Houzz and Pinterest. Lots of googling. You can try a fancy bathroom store and see what catches your eye. They often have sales people that can help you put together a look. Then you can look for cheaper options, if needed/wanted.

  5. #15
    twowhat? is offline Red Diamond level (10,000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liziz View Post
    This is all really helpful information, thank you all!

    hwin -- very good tip about waterproofing and that cement board doesn't cut it. What AM I looking for here?

    In terms of getting better ideas about what we want - what is everyone's best suggestions for how to research that? We only have very vague ideas at this point. Someone mentioned Houzz, so I'll be checking that out. What else have you done? Just visited supply stores? Other online outlets to look at?

    Thank you!
    I enjoyed this article:
    https://www.blesserhouse.com/how-to-...orating-style/

    We've also learned that we don't need to choose a "style" necessarily. Our overall style tendency is midcentury modern. But our bathroom mixes very traditional (clawfoot tub, wainscot, subway tile in shower, lever-style faucets) with modern (tub feet are white, wainscot is custom and a slim modern style that doesn't scream beadboard, faucets are chrome, quartz counters, wood look tile, subway tile in a modern color and dimension, etc). And a midcentury modern nod with a sleek barn door with integrated mirror, painted navy blue, and it all works together and we LOVE it. I would start with Pinterest and see what common themes keep coming up that you like. The search function in Pinterest that works sort of like a "more like this" is great. I preferred using Pinterest over Houzz, which I found more difficult to scroll through ideas.

  6. #16
    AnnieW625's Avatar
    AnnieW625 is offline Black Diamond level (25,000+ posts)
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    While I like Houzz and Pinterest I have to see things in person. It is rare that I find something and have my mind set on it until I see it in person. I did however have that luck with our last bathroom remodel. For example I saw our faucet online the day we approved the bathroom design (Moen Doux) and knew that was pretty much the one I wanted. I was immediately drawn to it. Same thing with the drawer pulls and knobs we went with for the bathroom (Emtek Art Decco). Everything else I had to look at person. I still looked at a ton of faucets and cabinet hardware in person just to make sure that I really wanted what I had initially saw. Sometimes you just have that feeling and are so happy you went with your gut when the job is complete.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Annie
    WOHM to two wonderful little girls born in April
    DD E, 15
    DD L, 11
    baby 2, 4-2009 (our Tri-18 baby)

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