Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    586

    Default Questions about School spending(money per student vs per student w/IEP &militarykids)

    Do school districts get more money for a student that has an IEP? A friend of my husbands has a son in elementary school. He is having a hard time with school, has low grades, hearing loss and an IEP. He isn't getting any support at his school. He is new to the school this year. This is frustrating me and the more I think about it, the madder I get! If you have any websites that give this info, can you please add them?
    Also, if you know anything about the government giving extra money to schools that have a high military family/students(around a military installation), that would be great, too.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    102

    Default

    The schools do get extra money for military kids. There is a form that the school sends home each year for the parent to sign that says they do in fact work on government land (base/post). It isn't just schools that have a high population of mil kids it is any school with mil kids. Our school must make a good amount of extra money because we don't have to provide any school supplies at all.

    I know nothing about IEPs or schools making more money for kids that have them. My inclination is to say no which is why it seems to be so difficult for kids to get the services that they need.

    I hope you find the answers you need. The base/post usually has a school liaison to help parents with school issues. I have never used one but have heard them mentioned.
    R
    SAHM to T (6/02), A (11/04), J (10/06) and J (9/09)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    US.
    Posts
    1,602

    Default

    If he has an IEP, that means he is getting support. If he is not getting the support listed on his IEP, parents should go to the special education director. If they don't believe he's getting the support he should be, there is an appeal process. There are a lot of legal protections with an IEP, so they should be able to pursue it if he's not getting what he needs. If the school disagrees about what he needs, there is a mediation process.
    C
    DS1 (04)
    DS2 (07)

  4. #4
    brittone2 is offline Blue Diamond level (20,000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    back to where we started
    Posts
    22,534

    Default

    Mama to DS-2004
    DD-2006
    and a new addition-ds born march 2010

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    9,947

    Default

    Because military families are transient, and often hold residency in a state other than the one they currently reside in and go to school in, the school loses out on tax money for those children. To make up for this, the federal govt pays the school extra money for each military child they have enrolled.

    They do not get extra money for each IEP child, but rather it comes out of a given special ed. budget given by the state.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by daisymommy; 12-13-2011 at 09:46 PM.
    Mama to "The Fantastic Four":
    DS 02
    DD 06
    DS 09
    DD 5/12

  6. #6
    Uno-Mom's Avatar
    Uno-Mom is offline Sapphire level (2000+ posts)
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,752

    Default

    For a child with an IEP, there are two major areas where the school can either do an awesome job, or drop the ball:

    1. Did they make a good IEP that really addresses what the child needs?
    2. Are they following through and really providing what they promised in the IEP?

    I know.some.schools do an amazing job at both, but often something goes wrong with 1 or 2. Sadly, parents often need to advocate strongly and not all parents have the personality or knowldege needed to do that. It can be awefully rough, as some parents here can attest.

    From my personal observation it also depends on the district and their general resources. For example, if it's a small district with very few kids on IEPs...even if those kids bring in extra dollars, those few kids' extra dollars won't be enough to have the best resources or specialists actuallg in that school. Even if t he school really wanted to. That doesn't make it.ok but it is sad reality. Other parents can probably add more good info....

    Often bumbling mother to baby girl "Sprog"
    Born November, 2009

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    California
    Posts
    22,684

    Default

    There is some federal funding for special education.

    http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/lis...sep/index.html

    Some states also provide funding to schools for special education services.

    Regardless, federal law requires that schools provide a free and appropriate education to students who qualify for special education. There are both statutory and regulatory provisions related to what schools must provide. There is no exemption for lack of funding. As a matter of law, it simply does not matter how a school finds the money to provide required services. I have had a principal try to raise the funding issue with me in an IEP meeting. I immediately quashed that by telling him that lack of funding was not relevant legally and it was his problem, not mine.

    I suggest checking out the Wrights Law website for information about how special education law works. And your friends might consider seeing if there are any non profits in your area who provide volunteer advocates to help them navigate the system. They also could potentially hire an advocate or consult an attorney if they are having difficulty with the school.

    Catherine

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    586

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wolverine2 View Post
    If he has an IEP, that means he is getting support. If he is not getting the support listed on his IEP, parents should go to the special education director. If they don't believe he's getting the support he should be, there is an appeal process. There are a lot of legal protections with an IEP, so they should be able to pursue it if he's not getting what he needs. If the school disagrees about what he needs, there is a mediation process.
    The IEP's were brought from his previous school and given to this school in August.

    Thanks everyone for all of the info.

  9. #9
    MissyAg94 is offline Platinum level (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,018

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daisymommy View Post
    Because military families are transient, and often hold residency in a state other than the one they currently reside in and go to school in, the school loses out on tax money for those children. To make up for this, the federal govt pays the school extra money for each military child they have enrolled.
    I am fairly certain that a school must have a certain percentage of students that have an active duty parent to qualify for the extra funds.

    Also, if you live in a state that funds education through property and sales tax, military members do pay those taxes. But your point for states that fund through income tax is valid.

    Also wanted to add that non-mil spouses pay state income tax.
    Last edited by MissyAg94; 12-13-2011 at 11:02 PM. Reason: clarity

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    California
    Posts
    22,684

    Default

    Oh, if your friends are military, it is possible that base/post legal services might be able to help them out. I really doubt they have anyone who knows much about special education law, but you never know. And of course, any lawyer can figure it out if they want to. I'm not sure if this falls into military legal services purview or not, but it might be worth asking.

    Catherine

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •